Makers Local 256 is a 501(c)3 charitable non-profit of like-minded individuals who have created a hackerspace located in Huntsville, AL.

I laser cut a box for our business cards because they kept falling off the lip of the white board. I also made a box for our pamphlets as they too kept falling.


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You can check out videos of the yarn dying process here.

Credits: Jonica had the original idea, Kirstin pushed the organization, Shae was entertaining, and Jennifer documented the whole thing.

Kirstin, Shae, and Jonica excited to do some yarn dying
Jonica, Shae, and Kirstin excited to do some yarn dying

During the week after our original idea to dye yarn, Shae purchased Jacquard acid dyes and undyed yarn. Kirstin purchased a stainless steel pot for dyeing along with white vinegar and filter masks. Kirstin did all of the research on required ingredients listed above, and what types of dyes should be used on a type of fiber. We decided to use acid dyes on protein based fibers, since that meant we could work with our most familiar and accessible material, animal fiber yarn. Acid dyes can be damaging when inhaled or absorbed through the mucus membranes; fortunately, Kirstin is also a lab tech in her day job, her expertise kept us safe during the process.

We assembled Saturday March 28th with the expectation that we would make mistakes and learn. After we carefully applied our safety equipment…

…Kirstin started with red dye and a small skein of alpaca yarn. We dumped the yarn into the pot, heated the water to a simmer, turned off the heat, and applied dye. We waited 30 minutes for the dye to set, and the resulting red yarn was beautiful!

Next, Shae chose blue, Jonica mixed yellow and green, and then we mixed all four colors into a large skein.

The small skeins were dry a few hours later, but the large skein took most of the weekend to dry.

We made the expected mistakes, and learned much.

1. Get all the yarn into the water with the dye.
2. Make sure the yarn is not tightly clumped together so all the yarn is exposed to the dye. We learned this requires cutting the ties that keep the skein from tangling.
3. An addendum to the second point is, use smaller lengths of yarn.

For our next session we’re hoping to re-dye the big chunk of yarn that didn’t get fully colored, and separate
the other large skeins of yarn into smaller skeins for more experiments.

I am happy to announce that we have completed reinforcing the floor in the “Art Area” of our loft. This marks the 4th and final section of the loft floor to be upgraded.

When we moved in to this space, the loft floor was a patchwork of saggy 1/2 inch plywood. Now the entire area is topped with 3/4 inch, tongue in grove, OSB. Now members can stomp around without fear of falling through holes.

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Thank you to everyone who came out and made flowers with us on February 7th. We were able to make a lot of flowers for the Wedding Week event. We had fabric, tissue paper, origami, and felt flowers. Check out the pictures below!

Kirstin, Jennifer, and Heather making flowers
Kirstin, Jennifer, and Heather making flowers
John, Heather, and Phil making flowers
John, Heather, and Phil making flowers
Kirstin and Dickie making flowers
Kirstin and Dickie making flowers
ALL THE FLOWERS!
ALL THE FLOWERS!
Fabric Flowers
Fabric Flowers
Origami Kusudama Flowers
Origami Kusudama Flowers
Calla Lilies
Calla Lilies
Anemones Flowers
Anemones Flowers
Tissue Paper Flowers
Tissue Paper Flowers
Origami Iris Flowers
Origami Iris Flowers